Strange World

Strange World

A journey deep into an uncharted and treacherous land, where fantastical creatures await the legendary Clades—a family of explorers whose differences threaten to topple their latest, and by far most crucial, mission.



Original Title: Strange World
Year: 2022
Countries: United States of America
Category: Animation,Science Fiction,Adventure,Family
Languages: English
Production Companies: Walt Disney Pictures,Walt Disney Animation Studios
Gender: Animation,Science Fiction,Adventure,Family
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt10298840
Movie Cast:

  • Searcher Clade (voice): Jake Gyllenhaal
  • Jaeger Clade (voice): Dennis Quaid
  • Ethan Clade (voice): Jaboukie Young-White
  • Meridian Clade (voice): Gabrielle Union
  • Callisto Mal (voice): Lucy Liu
  • Narrator / Radio Host 1 / Duffle (voice): Alan Tudyk
  • Diazo (voice): Jonathan Melo
  • Lonnie Redshirt (voice): Abraham Benrubi
  • Caspian (voice): Karan Soni
  • Pulk (voice): Adelina Anthony
  • Kardez (voice): Nik Dodani
  • Azimuth (voice): Francesca Reale
  • Ro (voice): Emily Kuroda
  • Rory (voice): Reed Buck
  • Radio Host 2 (voice): Katie Lowes
  • Client #2 (voice): LaNisa Renee Frederick
  • Client #3 (voice): Dave Kohut
  • Client #4 (voice): Alice Kina Diehl

Movie Crew:

  • Sound Designer: Ben Burtt
  • Animation Technical Director: Paul Aichele
  • Producer: Roy Conli
  • Art Direction: Ian Gooding
  • Head of Story: Burny Mattinson
  • Sound Supervisor: David E. Fluhr
  • Director: Don Hall
  • Music: Henry Jackman
  • Animation: Andrew Lawson
  • Storyboard Artist: Clio Chiang
  • Executive Producer: Jennifer Lee
  • Executive Music Producer: Tom MacDougall
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Gabriel Guy
  • Art Direction: Larry Wu
  • Animation: Anthony DeRosa
  • Animation: Kevin MacLean
  • Animation: Louis Jones
  • Animation: Mitja Rabar
  • Animation Supervisor: Vitor Vilela
  • Storyboard Artist: Don Dougherty
  • Modeling: Chris Patrick O'Connell
  • Animation: Dave Hardin
  • Character Technical Supervisor: Andrew Jennings
  • Character Technical Supervisor: Nicklas Puetz
  • Animation: Seth Hippen
  • Lighting Supervisor: Olun Riley
  • Animation: Zachary Rahman
  • Animation: Alexander Snow
  • Production Supervisor: Dave Kohut
  • Lighting Artist: Robert L. Miles
  • Orchestrator: Andrew Kinney
  • Production Supervisor: Brandon Holmes
  • Animation: Jason Herschaft
  • Co-Director: Qui Nguyen
  • Animation: Shay Stone
  • Animation: Gregory Verreault
  • Story Artist: Amy Henkels
  • Lighting Artist: Miguel Perez
  • Effects Supervisor: Bob Bennett
  • First Assistant Editor: Michael Weissman
  • Animation: Nathan Dillow
  • Lighting Artist: Ka Yaw Tan
  • Animation: Tony Bonilla
  • Animation Supervisor: Jason Figliozzi
  • Animation Supervisor: Michael Franceschi
  • Head of Animation: Justin Sklar
  • Animation Supervisor: David Stodolny
  • Animation: Wes Storhoff
  • First Assistant Editor: Adam DesCombes
  • Lighting Supervisor: Gina Warr
  • Visual Effects Technical Director: Rebecca Vallera-Thompson
  • Production Supervisor: Steph Gortz
  • Associate Editor: Anthony Durazzo
  • Visual Effects: Chris Carignan
  • Lighting Artist: Afonso Salcedo
  • Lighting Artist: Emily Yi
  • Production Design: Mehrdad Isvandi
  • Animation: Boris Maras
  • Animation Supervisor: Andrew Feliciano
  • Visual Effects: Le Joyce Tong
  • Animation Supervisor: Kim Hazel
  • Animation: Albert Rubio
  • Visual Effects Technical Director: Lisa M. Tse
  • Visual Effects: Masahito Yoshioka
  • Animation: Pete Devlin
  • Animation: Hector Godoy Garcia
  • Animation: Ken Kaiser
  • Animation: Pedro Daniel García Pérez
  • Lighting Artist: Luke Heathcock
  • Animation: Stephen Dahler
  • Animation: Theresa Adolph
  • Animation: Trevor Young
  • Modeling: Jonathan Lin
  • Animation: Mikee Sevilla
  • Lighting Artist: R.J. Peña
  • Animation: Mitchell Jao
  • Effects Supervisor: Deborah Carlson
  • Animation: Laura H. Han
  • Lighting Artist: Brian Adams
  • Head of Animation: Eric Goldberg
  • Storyboard Artist: Ryan Green
  • Animation: Ben Girmann
  • Production Supervisor: Nora Rogers
  • Story Artist: Hannah Leung
  • Story Artist: Carrie Liao
  • Lighting Artist: Ashley Souza
  • Animation: Mikey Wong
  • Lighting Artist: Chrisy Baek
  • Animation: Abby Boyce
  • Animation: Janel Drewis
  • Animation: David Badgerow
  • Animation: Manar Al Tawam
  • Production Supervisor: Sean Creveling
  • Production Supervisor: Steven Crowe
  • Production Supervisor: Jonny Hylton
  • Storyboard Artist: Mia Calderone
  • Story Artist: Teny Issakhanian
  • Visual Development: Jose Francisco Martinez
  • Production Coordinator: Ryn Soorholtz
  • Character Modelling Supervisor: Oscar A. Ayala
  • Casting Associate: Grace C. Kim
  • Music Programmer: Tyler Durham
  • Script Coordinator: Thai Bettistea
  • Animation: Ozan Basaldi
  • Animation: Kitty Fung
  • Animation: Taylor Gessler
  • Animation: Yohei Koike
  • Animation: Megan Kreiner
  • Animation: Caitlin Low
  • Animation: Paula Benedicto Martinez
  • Animation: Naoko Mizutori
  • Character Technical Supervisor: Michael Anthony Navarro
  • Modeling: Haengsook Oh
  • Animation: Olga Parshina
  • Animation: Krista Rogers
  • Animation: Jonah Sidhom
  • Animation: Chatrasal Singh
  • Animation: Malerie Walters
  • Modeling: Emma Wolfe
  • Visual Effects: Robert Zhou
  • Visual Effects Technical Director: Irene Weng
  • Visual Effects: Marie Tollec
  • Lighting Artist: Catlin Scroggie
  • Lighting Artist: Luke Pikora
  • Lighting Artist: Ash Ogasawara
  • Lighting Artist: James Joshua Lojo
  • Visual Effects Technical Director: Kendall Litaker
  • Lighting Artist: Walker Kennedy
  • Lighting Artist: Austin Hirsch

If you want to know other articles similar to Strange World you can visit the category Adventure.

    47 Review

  1. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  2. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  3. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  4. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  5. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  6. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  7. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  8. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  9. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  10. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  11. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  12. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  13. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  14. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  15. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  16. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  17. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  18. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  19. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  20. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  21. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  22. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  23. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  24. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  25. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  26. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  27. For being a Disney movie made today (2022) this is a fairly decent one. Sure, they have crammed in some of the usual woke nonsense but at least there is not really any of the blatant preaching the more extreme of Disney’s woke mob have managed to cram into things the last couple of years.

    It of course helps that it is a all new story and new characters so they didn’t wokeify and ruin some of the old classics.

    If one ignores the nonsense the story is pretty decent and so are the characters. Nothing to write home about but adequate. The coolest character is of course Jaeger. I quite liked him even though he sometimes was a bit dimwitted in his single mindedness. Searcher and his son Ethan are more bland and boring with one just wanting to be a farmer and the other one being the obligatory woke element in this movie.

    What really makes the movie rise slightly above being bland is the absolutely magnificent scenery. It is a strange world indeed. It is strange, weird, scary and beautiful all at the same time. This creature, Splat, that Ethan eventually befriends was a nice comical element.

    It is a shame though that they couldn’t create a better ending. I mean given what this strange world actually is surely there would be plenty of other options for harvesting energy instead of just more or less giving up. If the writers wanted to deliver some rubbish green message they failed miserably.

    Anyway, a decent enough movie. I did enjoy watching it.

  28. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  29. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  30. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  31. For being a Disney movie made today (2022) this is a fairly decent one. Sure, they have crammed in some of the usual woke nonsense but at least there is not really any of the blatant preaching the more extreme of Disney’s woke mob have managed to cram into things the last couple of years.

    It of course helps that it is a all new story and new characters so they didn’t wokeify and ruin some of the old classics.

    If one ignores the nonsense the story is pretty decent and so are the characters. Nothing to write home about but adequate. The coolest character is of course Jaeger. I quite liked him even though he sometimes was a bit dimwitted in his single mindedness. Searcher and his son Ethan are more bland and boring with one just wanting to be a farmer and the other one being the obligatory woke element in this movie.

    What really makes the movie rise slightly above being bland is the absolutely magnificent scenery. It is a strange world indeed. It is strange, weird, scary and beautiful all at the same time. This creature, Splat, that Ethan eventually befriends was a nice comical element.

    It is a shame though that they couldn’t create a better ending. I mean given what this strange world actually is surely there would be plenty of other options for harvesting energy instead of just more or less giving up. If the writers wanted to deliver some rubbish green message they failed miserably.

    Anyway, a decent enough movie. I did enjoy watching it.

  32. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  33. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  34. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  35. For being a Disney movie made today (2022) this is a fairly decent one. Sure, they have crammed in some of the usual woke nonsense but at least there is not really any of the blatant preaching the more extreme of Disney’s woke mob have managed to cram into things the last couple of years.

    It of course helps that it is a all new story and new characters so they didn’t wokeify and ruin some of the old classics.

    If one ignores the nonsense the story is pretty decent and so are the characters. Nothing to write home about but adequate. The coolest character is of course Jaeger. I quite liked him even though he sometimes was a bit dimwitted in his single mindedness. Searcher and his son Ethan are more bland and boring with one just wanting to be a farmer and the other one being the obligatory woke element in this movie.

    What really makes the movie rise slightly above being bland is the absolutely magnificent scenery. It is a strange world indeed. It is strange, weird, scary and beautiful all at the same time. This creature, Splat, that Ethan eventually befriends was a nice comical element.

    It is a shame though that they couldn’t create a better ending. I mean given what this strange world actually is surely there would be plenty of other options for harvesting energy instead of just more or less giving up. If the writers wanted to deliver some rubbish green message they failed miserably.

    Anyway, a decent enough movie. I did enjoy watching it.

  36. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  37. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  38. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  39. For being a Disney movie made today (2022) this is a fairly decent one. Sure, they have crammed in some of the usual woke nonsense but at least there is not really any of the blatant preaching the more extreme of Disney’s woke mob have managed to cram into things the last couple of years.

    It of course helps that it is a all new story and new characters so they didn’t wokeify and ruin some of the old classics.

    If one ignores the nonsense the story is pretty decent and so are the characters. Nothing to write home about but adequate. The coolest character is of course Jaeger. I quite liked him even though he sometimes was a bit dimwitted in his single mindedness. Searcher and his son Ethan are more bland and boring with one just wanting to be a farmer and the other one being the obligatory woke element in this movie.

    What really makes the movie rise slightly above being bland is the absolutely magnificent scenery. It is a strange world indeed. It is strange, weird, scary and beautiful all at the same time. This creature, Splat, that Ethan eventually befriends was a nice comical element.

    It is a shame though that they couldn’t create a better ending. I mean given what this strange world actually is surely there would be plenty of other options for harvesting energy instead of just more or less giving up. If the writers wanted to deliver some rubbish green message they failed miserably.

    Anyway, a decent enough movie. I did enjoy watching it.

  40. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  41. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  42. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  43. For being a Disney movie made today (2022) this is a fairly decent one. Sure, they have crammed in some of the usual woke nonsense but at least there is not really any of the blatant preaching the more extreme of Disney’s woke mob have managed to cram into things the last couple of years.

    It of course helps that it is a all new story and new characters so they didn’t wokeify and ruin some of the old classics.

    If one ignores the nonsense the story is pretty decent and so are the characters. Nothing to write home about but adequate. The coolest character is of course Jaeger. I quite liked him even though he sometimes was a bit dimwitted in his single mindedness. Searcher and his son Ethan are more bland and boring with one just wanting to be a farmer and the other one being the obligatory woke element in this movie.

    What really makes the movie rise slightly above being bland is the absolutely magnificent scenery. It is a strange world indeed. It is strange, weird, scary and beautiful all at the same time. This creature, Splat, that Ethan eventually befriends was a nice comical element.

    It is a shame though that they couldn’t create a better ending. I mean given what this strange world actually is surely there would be plenty of other options for harvesting energy instead of just more or less giving up. If the writers wanted to deliver some rubbish green message they failed miserably.

    Anyway, a decent enough movie. I did enjoy watching it.

  44. CinemaSerf dice:

    The last fifteen minutes or so do redeem this to a certain extent, but otherwise it is a curiously disjointed story that seems drawn from "Island at the Top of the World" (1974) with bits of "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" (1959) and "The Lost World" (1960) thrown in for good measure. We start with the legendary explorer "Jaeger Clade" who is determined to find a way past the enclosing mountain peaks of their community. Like many a father, he drags along his unwilling son and when things come to an head, he proceeds alone leaving the younger man "Searcher" with his newly discovered crop of radioactive Brussels sprouts. Twenty-five years pass, and he has now grown up and successfully developed a farm of these particularly useful vegetables. He even has his own statue! Suddenly, though, the plants start to die and it falls to him and his own young son "Ethan" to embark on a perilous mission to the heart of the plant's root system and save it before it dies. These escapades are nicely and creatively animated with some fun to be had along the way, but there is simply too much sentiment, familial discord and cheesy dialogue to sustain this - as well as a dog that really annoys after a while. The characterisations are really undercooked and just about every box you can imagine is ticked as the story ultimately concludes with a bit of a nod to Oriental mythology. It is certainly watchable, but there is no need to shell out on a cinema ticket for it. Disney+ will do fine in due course when you can safely leave the kids to watch.

  45. Chris Sawin dice:

    Visually wondrous but spectacularly dull, unbelievably unfunny, and lackluster from the inside out in every other aspect, _Strange World_ is a superficially stimulating with the entertainment value of a wet yet adventurous sponge.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/02/strange-world-review-a-mundane-narrative-nurtured-by-invigorating-visuals/

  46. Nathan dice:

    Strange World had the potential to be another Disney classic, but unfortunately, some problems limited my total enjoyment.

    From the get-go, I need to mention that the animation is breathtaking, and is probably the best Disney has done so far. The animators got to flex their muscles with the fantastic worlds and interesting creatures. It is so flush with color and energy; it was extremely pleasant on the eyes from start to finish.

    The overarching story was fun, and I enjoyed the premise of discovering a technology that is simultaneously progressing your civilization while also destroying it. It has a great message of preserving the world, even though it is extremely heavy-handed at times. The action was great, the exploration was mesmerizing, and the diversity of the world was superb. At a macro level, this movie worked for me in almost every way.

    The main issues I had with this film were the characters. Individually they are all interesting and unique, even though some of them are major caricatures. But the connections between them are all over the place. A lot of the motivations the characters have are inorganic and feel forced to push the narrative of parent vs child throughout generations. This left me having very little emotions when the characters clashed in high-tension arguments which limited a lot of the impact of the film.

    Although, the blue creature was cute, funny, and perfect! I loved him.
    This movie had a lot going on, and it suffers for it. As a kid movie, the plot and themes were all over the place, and it was sometimes confusing for me. Despite that, it is a visual spectacle filled with many laughs and fun adventures.

    Score: 67% |
    Verdict: Good |
    Theater Verdict: See It

  47. For being a Disney movie made today (2022) this is a fairly decent one. Sure, they have crammed in some of the usual woke nonsense but at least there is not really any of the blatant preaching the more extreme of Disney’s woke mob have managed to cram into things the last couple of years.

    It of course helps that it is a all new story and new characters so they didn’t wokeify and ruin some of the old classics.

    If one ignores the nonsense the story is pretty decent and so are the characters. Nothing to write home about but adequate. The coolest character is of course Jaeger. I quite liked him even though he sometimes was a bit dimwitted in his single mindedness. Searcher and his son Ethan are more bland and boring with one just wanting to be a farmer and the other one being the obligatory woke element in this movie.

    What really makes the movie rise slightly above being bland is the absolutely magnificent scenery. It is a strange world indeed. It is strange, weird, scary and beautiful all at the same time. This creature, Splat, that Ethan eventually befriends was a nice comical element.

    It is a shame though that they couldn’t create a better ending. I mean given what this strange world actually is surely there would be plenty of other options for harvesting energy instead of just more or less giving up. If the writers wanted to deliver some rubbish green message they failed miserably.

    Anyway, a decent enough movie. I did enjoy watching it.

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