Avatar: The Way of Water

Avatar: The Way of Water

Set more than a decade after the events of the first film, learn the story of the Sully family (Jake, Neytiri, and their kids), the trouble that follows them, the lengths they go to keep each other safe, the battles they fight to stay alive, and the tragedies they endure.



Original Title: Avatar: The Way of Water
Year: 2022
Countries: United States of America
Category: Science Fiction,Adventure,Action
Languages: English
Production Companies: Lightstorm Entertainment,20th Century Studios
Gender: Science Fiction,Adventure,Action
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1630029
Movie Cast:

  • Jake Sully: Sam Worthington
  • Neytiri: Zoe Saldaña
  • Kiri / Dr. Grace Augustine: Sigourney Weaver
  • Lo'ak: Britain Dalton
  • Colonel Miles Quaritch: Stephen Lang
  • Miles 'Spider' Socorro: Jack Champion
  • Tonowari: Cliff Curtis
  • Ronal: Kate Winslet
  • Norm Spellman: Joel David Moore
  • Mo'at: CCH Pounder
  • General Frances Ardmore: Edie Falco
  • Mick Scoresby: Brendan Cowell
  • Dr. Ian Garvin: Jemaine Clement
  • Neteyam: Jamie Flatters
  • Tuk: Trinity Bliss
  • Tsireya: Bailey Bass
  • Aonung: Filip Geljo
  • Rotxo: Duane Evans Jr.
  • Parker Selfridge: Giovanni Ribisi
  • Dr. Max Patel: Dileep Rao
  • Recom Wainfleet: Matt Gerald
  • Ta'unui Olecthan: Robert Okumu
  • Ta'unui Tsahik: Jennifer Stafford
  • Tarsem: Keston John
  • Recom Mansk: Kevin Dorman
  • Recom Zdinarsik: Alicia Vela-Bailey
  • Recom Fike: Sean Anthony Moran
  • Recom Prager: Andrew Arrabito
  • Recom Ja: Johnny Alexander
  • Recom Zhang: Kim Do
  • Recom Lopez: Victor T. Lopez
  • Recom Walker: Maria Walker
  • Stringer: Phil Brown
  • Bio Lab Tech: Jocelyn Christian
  • Neuroscientist: Joel Tobeck
  • Female Med-Tech: Moana Ete
  • Male Med-Tech: Phil Peleton
  • Metkayina Warrior: Jamie Landau
  • Mako Sub #1 Pilot: Jim Moore
  • Mako Sub #1 Gunner: Benjamin Hoetjes
  • Mako Sub #2 Pilot: Nikita Tu Bryant
  • Mako Sub #2 Gunner: Anthony Ahern
  • Matador Co-Pilot: Shane Rangi
  • Kestrel Pilot: Rick Lucas
  • Neurotech #1: Tanya Drewery
  • Neurotech #2: Ava Diakhaby
  • Sea Dragon First Mate: Isaac Te Reina
  • Crabsuit Pilot: Eric Farmer
  • Skel Trooper: Philip Mtambo
  • Spider Double: Daniel Lough
  • Young Spider: Cruz Moir
  • Toddler Spider: Alex Lucas
  • Young Kiri: Scarlett Fernandez
  • Young Lo'ak: Chloe Coleman
  • Young Neteyam: Jeremy Irwin
  • Na'vi (uncredited): Jake McLean
  • Metkayina Interpreter (uncredited): CJ Jones

Movie Crew:

  • Editor: Stephen E. Rivkin
  • Unit Production Manager: David Valdes
  • Story: Josh Friedman
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Christopher Boyes
  • Main Title Theme Composer: James Horner
  • Story: James Cameron
  • Editor: David Brenner
  • Story: Shane Salerno
  • Casting: Margery Simkin
  • Director of Photography: Russell Carpenter
  • Costume Design: Deborah Lynn Scott
  • Producer: Jon Landau
  • Supervising Art Director: Kim Sinclair
  • Additional Director of Photography: Richard Bluck
  • Art Direction: Simon Bright
  • Production Supervisor: Daren Hicks
  • Editor: John Refoua
  • Art Direction: Ken Turner
  • Story: Rick Jaffa
  • Story: Amanda Silver
  • Supervising Art Director: Luke Freeborn
  • Stunts: Lauren Mary Kim
  • Art Direction: Andy McLaren
  • Stunts: Brad Martin
  • Set Designer: Kevin Loo
  • Second Unit Director: Garrett Warren
  • Production Design: Dylan Cole
  • Second Unit Director: Richard Baneham
  • Set Designer: Evan Webber
  • Assistant Art Director: Anne Costa
  • Art Direction: Stephen Christensen
  • Researcher: Jon Glover
  • Production Design: Ben Procter
  • Hair Supervisor: Frankie Karena
  • Casting Associate: Stacey Pianko
  • Art Direction: Robert Bavin
  • Visual Effects: Brian Adler
  • Set Designer: Ross Perkin
  • Transportation Coordinator: Denny Caira
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Gwendolyn Yates Whittle
  • Sound Effects Editor: David Chrastka
  • Visual Effects Producer: Lena Scanlan
  • Associate Producer: Brigitte Yorke
  • Visual Effects Supervisor: Eric Saindon
  • Stunt Coordinator: Stuart Thorp
  • Costume Supervisor: Emily Egge
  • Set Designer: Shari Ratliff
  • Visual Effects Supervisor: Joe Letteri
  • Costume Supervisor: Carrie Bauer
  • Set Costumer: Gia Jimenez
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Gary Summers
  • Art Direction: Sam Storey
  • Set Designer: Jeffrey Beck
  • Military Consultant: Andrew Arrabito
  • Visual Effects Producer: Walter Garcia
  • Ager/Dyer: Tyra Youland
  • Makeup Artist: Franca Gallo
  • Stunts: Kenny Sheard
  • Animation Supervisor: Daniel Barrett
  • Art Direction: Andrew Chan
  • Set Dresser: Amber Richards
  • Songs: The Weeknd
  • Set Costumer: Nat Van Halle
  • Set Designer: Ed Symon
  • Stunts: Chris Silcox
  • Makeup Artist: Michele Perry
  • Art Direction: Steven Light-Orr
  • Other: CJ Jones
  • Original Music Composer: Simon Franglen
  • Set Costumer: Brian Barela
  • Supervising Art Director: Aashrita Kamath
  • Set Medic: Kevin A. Canamar
  • Ager/Dyer: Jack Taggart
  • Key Hair Stylist: Vinnie Ashton
  • Makeup Artist: Cody Dysart
  • Key Makeup Artist: Shay Lawrence
  • Set Designer: Andrew Kattie
  • Set Designer: Alasdair Mott
  • Tattoo Designer: Michael Krehl
  • Art Direction: Alister Baxter
  • Set Designer: Brendon Sweeney
  • Set Designer: Colette Mullin
  • Grip: Travis Brady
  • Gaffer: Salim Bensrhir
  • Art Direction: Rudie Schaefer
  • Second Assistant Director: Simeon Jones
  • Art Direction: Ben Milsom
  • Visual Effects: Daniel McGraw
  • Set Dresser: Ben Whale
  • Set Designer: Yvonne Yip
  • Assistant Art Director: Sarah Delucchi
  • First Assistant Director: Maria Battle Campbell
  • Set Costumer: Rewa Lewis
  • Set Costumer: Amy Wright
  • Set Designer: Marina Stojanovic
  • Set Decoration: Vanessa Cole
  • Prosthetics: Don Brooker
  • Set Dresser: John Ternent
  • Set Costumer: Catharine Stuart
  • Assistant Art Director: Virginia Berg
  • Visual Effects: Joe Howes
  • Set Designer: Rebecca Asquith
  • Makeup Artist: Katie Fox-Heywood
  • Set Designer: Daniel Koene
  • Makeup Artist: Carly Marr

If you want to know other articles similar to Avatar: The Way of Water you can visit the category Action.

    459 Review

  1. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  2. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  3. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  4. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  5. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  6. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  7. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  8. An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  9. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  10. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  11. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  12. An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  13. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  14. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  15. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  16. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  17. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  18. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  19. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  20. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  21. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  22. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  23. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  24. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  25. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  26. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  27. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  28. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  29. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  30. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  31. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  32. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  33. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  34. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  35. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  36. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  37. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  38. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  39. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  40. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  41. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  42. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  43. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  44. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  45. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  46. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  47. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  48. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  49. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  50. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  51. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  52. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  53. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  54. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  55. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  56. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  57. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  58. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  59. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  60. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  61. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  62. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  63. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  64. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  65. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  66. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  67. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  68. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  69. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  70. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  71. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  72. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  73. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  74. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  75. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  76. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  77. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  78. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  79. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  80. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  81. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  82. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  83. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  84. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  85. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  86. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  87. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  88. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  89. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  90. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  91. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  92. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  93. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  94. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  95. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  96. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  97. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  98. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  99. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  100. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  101. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  102. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  103. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  104. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  105. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  106. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  107. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  108. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  109. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  110. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  111. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  112. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  113. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  114. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  115. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  116. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  117. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  118. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  119. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  120. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  121. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  122. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  123. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  124. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  125. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  126. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  127. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  128. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  129. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  130. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  131. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  132. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  133. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  134. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  135. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  136. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider", they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  137. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  138. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  139. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  140. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  141. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  142. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  143. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  144. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  145. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  146. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  147. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  148. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  149. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  150. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  151. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  152. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  153. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  154. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  155. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  156. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  157. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  158. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  159. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  160. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  161. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  162. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  163. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  164. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  165. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  166. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  167. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  168. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  169. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  170. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  171. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  172. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  173. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  174. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  175. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  176. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  177. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  178. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  179. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  180. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  181. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  182. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  183. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  184. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  185. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  186. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  187. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  188. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  189. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  190. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  191. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  192. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  193. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  194. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  195. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  196. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  197. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  198. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  199. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  200. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  201. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  202. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  203. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  204. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  205. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  206. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  207. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  208. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  209. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  210. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  211. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  212. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  213. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  214. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  215. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  216. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  217. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  218. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  219. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  220. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  221. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  222. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  223. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  224. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  225. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  226. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  227. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  228. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  229. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  230. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  231. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  232. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  233. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  234. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  235. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  236. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  237. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  238. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  239. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  240. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  241. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  242. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  243. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  244. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  245. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  246. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  247. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  248. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  249. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  250. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  251. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  252. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  253. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  254. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  255. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  256. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  257. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  258. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  259. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  260. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  261. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  262. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  263. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  264. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  265. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  266. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  267. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  268. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  269. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  270. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  271. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  272. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  273. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  274. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  275. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  276. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  277. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  278. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  279. Kay Cee dice:

    Audio was superb. Video was great, but it the 60fps takes some getting used to. Story was awesome!

  280. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  281. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  282. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  283. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  284. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  285. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  286. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  287. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  288. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  289. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  290. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  291. Kay Cee dice:

    Audio was superb. Video was great, but it the 60fps takes some getting used to. Story was awesome!

  292. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  293. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  294. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  295. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  296. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  297. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  298. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  299. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  300. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  301. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  302. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  303. Kay Cee dice:

    Audio was superb. Video was great, but it the 60fps takes some getting used to. Story was awesome!

  304. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  305. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  306. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  307. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  308. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  309. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  310. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  311. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  312. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  313. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  314. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  315. Kay Cee dice:

    Audio was superb. Video was great, but it the 60fps takes some getting used to. Story was awesome!

  316. Appfel dice:

    I really enjoyed Avatar: The way of water! It's a great second part to Avatar, getting back into the fight, setting a new environment and it actually left me even more thinking, of how we just destroy our earth and how bad humans can get. It is a long movie, but I enjoyed it so much, I didn't care. So, I would really say: watch it, it is worth it, especially when you watch the first part before, to get back into the mood!

  317. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  318. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  319. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  320. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  321. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  322. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  323. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  324. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  325. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  326. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  327. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  328. Kay Cee dice:

    Audio was superb. Video was great, but it the 60fps takes some getting used to. Story was awesome!

  329. Appfel dice:

    I really enjoyed Avatar: The way of water! It's a great second part to Avatar, getting back into the fight, setting a new environment and it actually left me even more thinking, of how we just destroy our earth and how bad humans can get. It is a long movie, but I enjoyed it so much, I didn't care. So, I would really say: watch it, it is worth it, especially when you watch the first part before, to get back into the mood!

  330. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean Na’vi and then fight Stephen Lang. But the new movie also focuses on a group of annoying teens that constantly get themselves in trouble and peril over and over again throughout the much too long 3+ hour runtime and sidelining better, more established characters. All the strengths and weaknesses of the first movie are back in this one, with the bonus of being compared to the original at every turn. It really is a visual feast and special effects masterpiece, but just like the first Avatar, that’s all it is.

  331. MSB dice:

    FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW @ https://www.msbreviews.com/movie-reviews/avatar-the-way-of-water-spoiler-free-review

    "Avatar: The Way of Water clearly sets itself apart from other blockbusters, building on 13 years of preparation to deliver a memorable CINEMA experience by the one and only James Cameron.

    A visually, technically breathtaking adventure, particularly in the truly stunning underwater sequences. Score (Simon Franglen) remains epic, and the genuine dynamics between the characters of the Sully family lead the viewer to strongly, emotionally invest in them - the performances of the cast, namely Zoe Saldaña, are vital for the film's success.

    Too bad the recycled, generic narrative doesn't keep up with the creativity, dedication, and innovation levels allocated to the technical elements. Underwhelming to the point of making the three-hour runtime feel heavier than it should, but for fans of the original - which remains supreme - it's far from ruining one of the year's must-see theater experiences."

    Rating: B+

  332. tmdb45226627 dice:

    An exciting return to Pandora: the world of Na'vi. One of the best movies, like 2009's Avatar, to see in 3D! The characters seem to come out of the screen and it seems to witness the events firsthand. The world of Na'vi has changed and is once again in danger. Man is the cause of evil as in reality. We are destroying our planet that used to be our Pandora. Pandora is our home, we are Pandora. The houses of the Na'vi look like the tents of the American Indians, for me this is no coincidence and recalls the genocide of the American Indians. In my opinion it is a good sequel that deals with very relevant themes such as love, family and mourning. The initial water monologue which then returns towards the end is very poetic and universal! Emotional film that in some parts makes you cry. I recommend viewing in 3D for those who have already seen the previous film and were fascinated by that amazing world and the protagonist's love and life story.

  333. TimeZone dice:

    **My rating: 10/10**
    Why? I rate any movie based on a few things. Warning! Potential Spoilers.

    **1. Story**. Is the story compelling, does it stick in your mind after the movie, haunting you like a ghost, forcing you to think about it and even your own life? Does it have any positive messages aka moral of the story.

    The story of The Way of Water is indeed compelling. The Conflict is multifaceted. Family conflict, Human-Na'vi conflict, Tribal Conflict and most importantly, personal conflict, aka identity conflict. The identity conflict is mostly fuelled by outcast feeling. There are a lot of people including Jake who at some point feel like they don't belong. I believe most people feel this way at some point in life, you don’t need to be in the protected minority groups for you to feel like an outcast. And while we may not be accepted for who we are, defining who are begins with ourselves first. Our world is full of people who want to be identified in one way or another. But have they identified themselves first? Just remember, most people feel discriminated for one reason or another in life. Religion, gender, skin colour, country, body size or smartness in school, political affiliation. Nobody gets love all round all times. Know who you are and don’t fuss to much about it. Learn a losson from Spider (Miles Socorro).

    **2. Characters**. Are there likeable characters you can get attached to? Characters you remember later, characters that inspire. Characters that grow.
    Spidey is a new character, and he has a great story to tell. Jake has changed a lot too and for good reason. People undergo a lot of transformation in life. You can’t be what Don Williams calls a Rake and Ramblin’ Man your entire life. I read an article review complaining how Jake tucked his tail and ran. That review completely missed the point. Jakes decision may not have been the right one, but put in his situation, it is a decision that a lot of people would make.

    **3. Acting**. Is the acting good? Is it realistic enough to be believable to a point you forget the people are just acting? I was more than impressed by Neytiri’s “gone nuts” scene. I felt her pain, and in that instance, I was nuts too. I honestly forgot this was just a movie. Actors can make you cry, and that is just how it should be. You forget that it is just an act, no need to cry. I also read an article that complained about the dialogue of the teenagers. I don’t know what the reviewer expected. Philosophy from teens? Their conversation is believable enough for their age.

    **4. Everything tied together**. A good story told by good and believable characters needs a setup. Something to tie them together into a bundle. Avatar ties everything together with wonderful visuals. I don’t need to say more.

  334. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  335. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  336. Chris Sawin dice:

    State-of-the-art special effects, revolutionary underwater cameras, and the resurrection of what is otherwise a mostly forgotten movie theater format can’t hide the fact that _Avatar: The Way of Water_ is basically the same movie as the original with more blue people (some are slightly green now!) that get on your last nerve. The emotion in the film feels forced and the story is like swapping a blue thread for a green one as it threads the same, withered fabric from 2009. This is a special effects extravaganza with nauseating results that only partially impresses and mostly succumbs to being its own biggest fanatic.

    **Full review:** https://boundingintocomics.com/2022/12/19/avatar-the-way-of-water-review-mo-navi-mo-problems/

  337. strayndger dice:

    No matter what you say about the story, you can't deny the fact that **James Cameron** managed to make eyes drool for 3hrs and 20mins. A movie that's meant to be watched on the biggest screen!.

  338. CinemaSerf dice:

    Well we ought not to have expected "Jake" (Sam Worthington) and "Neytiri" (Zoe Saldana) to have let the grass grow during the intervening years since we were first introduced to the idyllic world of "Pandora". Now with four children and their human friend "Spider" (Jack Champion - remember Johnny Sheffield?), they are living life to the full. Until, that is, one night they see a new star in the sky. Star? Well, no - it's the ships announcing the return of the human beings, this time even more bent on the conquest of their planet now that the Earth is finally on it's knees. Armed to the hilt with the latest technology and weaponry, and commanded by the essence of the departed "Col. Quaritch" - who also now leads a squad of Na'vi-esque avatars of his own - things look ominous for the "Sully" family. Realising that they are front and centre for their persecutors, they relocate to (saddle themselves on) a remote, water-based community where they hope, rather unrealistically, to be able to sit it out... This is undoubtedly a beautiful piece of cinema to watch. 3D and IMAX with a classily crafted score from Simon Franglen and a message that trumpets the cruciality of the symbiotic relationships between all creatures that live on a world where co-operation and understanding are vital to the survival of all. Thing is, though, that all of that glorious cinematography starts to get just a bit repetitive after about an hour and the middle portion of this really does drag. Indeed, were this to have been a long "Blue Planet" style documentary alerting us to the dangers of mankind's rampant abuse of resources with scant regard to the implications for any other species, then I would have enjoyed it better in three parts with Sir David Attenborough's mellifluous narration. It isn't though, and the story is stretched so terribly thinly that - sorry, sacrilege I know - I was actually bored a bit. It does pick up for the last forty minutes or so as the denouement provides for loads of action-packed pyrotechnics but to be honest, I had sort of lost interest by that point. Certainly, it is a great looking film that offers us food for thought, but as a story - I thought it weak, predictable and at times it does just a little too much of it's own recycling. Indeed - had their children actually done what they were told in the first place, there might not have been much of a story at all! Essential on a big screen.

  339. Amazing effects and a stunning story.

  340. Nathan dice:

    Avatar: The Way of Water is a visual spectacle from start to finish. The scenery, cinematography, and CGI constantly had a smile on my face, but is it enough to carry the film?

    While the previous entry had its fair share of story-related problems, the sequel corrects most of my issues and delivers a heartfelt family story. The main improvement from the first entry is character development. I had a genuine emotional connection with the Sully family and was invested in their safety. These feelings created some genuine tension when any of the family members were in danger, I felt my body tense up as I waited to see what the conflict's conclusion would be, which is a gigantic improvement from the first film where I could not care less who died or survived.

    The return of Stephan Lang as Colonel Miles Quaritch brought the overly campy villain back to the screen in a bad way. Quaritch is a caricature of a "villain" where his actions and attitude are evil for the sake of being the bad guy. His anger toward Jake Sully does seem a little bit more believable hear as his previous self was murdered by him, but the over-the-top theatrics are just too much for me.

    Another aspect of the story that did not feel right to me was the children constantly disobeying their parents for the sake of plot progression. Countless times, Jake Sully's kids would do the opposite of what they were told, leaving them in a vulnerable state to be captured. This danger forced Jake Sully to constantly expose himself and help draw the threat ever closer to his family. The moments that result are great as we get to see the dichotomy between Jake being a father and his militaristic background. This is at the heart of the story and worked for me.

    I was surprised to see how well-paced the film was despite its over three-hour runtime. There are some pretty slow parts, specifically the second act, but the visuals and the character journeys that happen during these parts are so interesting that they didn't impact me negatively; I was just happy to see new and beautiful aspects of Pandora.

    The performances were fantastic throughout. It is a testament to both the actors/actresses and also the technology that can display such complex emotions and visual nuances on entirely CGI creatures. Sigourney Weaver was a highlight with Kiri, who was at the forefront of the entire film. To be completely honest, I did not even know she was played by Weaver; the mix between her performance and voice modulation created a compelling 14-year-old girl that was a huge part of the story. Sam Worthington was incredible and Zoe Saldana was perfect. Saldana does so much acting with her facial expressions as Ney'tirl, which is on display during many emotional scenes her character goes through. She was a bit sidelined during this film, but when she was on screen, she was impactful.

    Avatar has some incredibly heavy themes at play. One of the strongest and most relevant messages was anti-poaching. I mention this because there was such a hard scene in this movie that had me on the verge of tears. It was something I'd never seen in the film; it was both beautiful in the brutality it displayed and the emotional response of the Na'vi.

    Overall, this movie is deserving of the hype and needs to be seen on the biggest screen available. James Cameron delivered on the 13 years build-up to the sequel and has gotten me excited for the three sequels planned for the next decade.

    Score: 88%
    Verdict: Excellent

  341. Kay Cee dice:

    Audio was superb. Video was great, but it the 60fps takes some getting used to. Story was awesome!

  342. Appfel dice:

    I really enjoyed Avatar: The way of water! It's a great second part to Avatar, getting back into the fight, setting a new environment and it actually left me even more thinking, of how we just destroy our earth and how bad humans can get. It is a long movie, but I enjoyed it so much, I didn't care. So, I would really say: watch it, it is worth it, especially when you watch the first part before, to get back into the mood!

  343. mooney240 dice:

    **Avatar: The Way of Water follows in its predecessor’s footsteps with stunning effects and a mediocre story.**

    It’s a James Cameron film, so it’s impressive. The special effects, camerawork, world-building, and action were all off the charts. But Avatar: The Way of Water struggles like its predecessor in the story and character development departments. In fact, the story of The Way of Water is almost identical to the first Avatar. Instead of humans learning to be Na’vi and then fighting Stephen slang, a family of forest Na’vi learns to be ocean N